Why so much curbing

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Why so much curbing

Postby Ty » Thu Aug 07, 2014 8:54 pm

In today's pop and r&b, most singers use curbing, even when attempting sing powerfully, is it b/c of the influence of soul music, what do you guys think

Also does anybody know of any pop, and or r&b singers in current music, that often use edge and/or overdrive (both male and female)
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Re: Why so much curbing

Postby Mungfield » Fri Aug 08, 2014 12:50 pm

Who knows? It's bit like asking: Why do folk guitarists prefer the western guitar, when classical guitarists prefer nylon strings.

Also, "Pop" is a bit of a broad term. I guess that George Michael sings pop. He uses a lot of edge and overdrive.

Regards
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Re: Why so much curbing

Postby Kaare » Wed Aug 27, 2014 7:15 pm

I would say that the general pop artist today is much more in medium full metal than in Curbing actually.
We can gain the same medium volume and for many its much easier to control than Curbing.

Maybe you can post a link of the Curbing singers?

Best regards
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Re: Why so much curbing

Postby breakin » Fri Oct 10, 2014 9:39 pm

I might be wrong but just a little thing I've been thinking about:

Some years ago the word curbing was the answer to all "what mode is he singing in". Then I think CVT has changed somewhat and I think that curbing as it is described now is not as dominating as it was. The new answers are medium overdrive / medium edge and/or something-something-like-something. And sometimes curbing. I'm not sure if this is in the newest book or if it will be in the next one, but at least I think that is what the new CVT-teachers are being taught these days.

This is somewhat confusing because while CVT gave people a consistent terminology for a little while, there are now different versions of CVT and different people might have read different editions. Also old questions on the CVT-forum might have outdated answers. This leads to uncertainty.

Case in point:

The page http://completevocalinstitute.com/vocal ... cal-modes/ is really nice, but is it 100% up-2-date? I don't know!
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Re: Why so much curbing

Postby Dino » Thu Oct 16, 2014 8:22 pm

breakin wrote:This is somewhat confusing because while CVT gave people a consistent terminology for a little while, there are now different versions of CVT and different people might have read different editions. Also old questions on the CVT-forum might have outdated answers. This leads to uncertainty.

Case in point:

The page http://completevocalinstitute.com/vocal ... cal-modes/ is really nice, but is it 100% up-2-date? I don't know!


CVT is constantly evolving as Catherine makes new scientific discovery. That is part of the charm. I've been with the program for a couple of years and I remember that "neutral without air" used to be called "compressed neutral", and edge use to be called "belting", they changed it because people were abusing that term. This is something I embrace, because it shows CVT's readiness to throw unquestioned "truths" overboard in order to make instructions as clear as possible. At this point you might want to ask yourself why you came to CVT in the first place. Isn't it much more comfortable to use the common vocabulary of "register", "chest/head voice", "pharyngeal", "throaty", etc etc that everyone else is using? Aye, they mean things for different teachers, but hey, it gives you an impression of consistency. In CVT they regularly discover that they are confusing different physical phenomena, so then they have to split them into two terms.

I have some very concrete examples of this. Lately I've been struggling with what the heck people mean by "pharyngeal" voice. Turns out that they are confusing nasal resonance, twang, open nasal passage, velum and sound color with each other and lumping it all into one term! And don't get me started on "The Mix Voice". Another example is that neutral with/without air, flagolet, high pitch, and MLN are all lumped together under the term "falsetto".

About the four modes, yes I'd say they still apply, but the picture has been made much more complete by introducing the "like" modes between the four main "countries" on the singing map.

Just my 2 cents

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